Health Sciences – GNO, Inc. Career Guide

Health Sciences

Opportunities for a career in healthcare has never been brighter for the Greater New Orleans region. People come to the region from different cities, states, and countries to see healthcare specialists. This is especially true as the facilities to support the industry are built out. Some of these assets can be found on 1,500 acres along Canal Street spanning the Downtown and Mid-City neighborhoods. Among the most exciting projects include the Veterans Administration Hospital, theĀ  University Medical Center, the Louisiana Cancer Research Center, and the New Orleans BioInnovation Center (NOBIC).

People who are happy and successful working in healthcare usually like to help others. They are concerned for the welfare of patients, and can deal with people of diverse backgrounds in stressful situations. People who are caregivers must be patient and comfortable with sickness and bodily functions. Almost all positions in outpatient health care require attention to detail and good oral communication. People with a range of educational backgrounds work in healthcare. Some jobs require years of training beyond a college degree and others require less than a college degree. People can move up the ladder in this industry by getting more education and experience. Good math and science skills are important. Many jobs involve evening or weekend work and many workers are on part-time schedules. Specific computer based skills are needed for administration and billing jobs.

At a Glance

  • 77,805 JOBS IN THE GREATER NEW ORLEANS REGION
  • 13,274 PROJECTED NEW JOBS OVER THE NEXT DECADE
  • 52% OF JOBS REQUIRE MIDDLE-SKILLS
  • 29,834 PROJECTED JOB OPENINGS OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS
  • $15.75/HR AVERAGE MEDIAN MIDDLE-SKILL JOB EARNINGS
  • $52.60/HR AVERAGE MEDIAN HIGH-SKILL JOB EARNINGS FOR GRADUATE DEGREE HOLDERS

Career Map

Distribution of Skills

The Health Sciences sector requires more workers that are classified as middle- and high-skilled than the GNO economy as a whole. The skill level in the industry highlights the importance of a highly trained workforce in order to meet future job growth demand in the industry.

What are middle- and high-skill jobs?

We define middle skill jobs as those that generally require some education or training above a high school diploma but less than a bachelor’s degree. These postsecondary education and training
requirements can include associate’s degrees, industry recognized credentials, on-the-job training, previous work experiences, or generally ‘some college’ but less than a bachelor’s degree. High-skill jobs require a bachelor’s degree or higher. Basic-skill jobs require no formal educational requirements. Although the educational barrier to entry associated with basic-skill occupations is low, this is not to say that these occupations do not require skills and certifications to enter
the workforce.

Health Sciences Top High-Skill Jobs

DescriptionEmployed in Industry Group (2018)Change (2018 - 2028)% of Total Jobs in Industry Group (2018)Median Hourly EarningsTypical Entry Level Education
Registered Nurses15,7482,11020.5%$31.55Bachelor's degree
Physicians and Surgeons, All Other1,6994462.2%$95.69Doctoral or professional degree
Nurse Practitioners7713511.0%$45.85Master's degree
Medical and Health Services Managers7952331.0%$43.12Bachelor's degree
Physical Therapists8632321.1%$36.44Doctoral or professional degree
Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors5501870.7%$19.86Bachelor's degree
Physician Assistants2301720.3%$45.88Master's degree
Family and General Practitioners3731620.5%$76.13Doctoral or professional degree
Occupational Therapists3471000.5%$34.75Master's degree
Pharmacists1,095931.4%$53.70Doctoral or professional degree

Health Sciences Top Middle-Skill Jobs

DescriptionEmployed in Industry Group (2018)Change (2018 - 2028)% of Total Jobs in Industry Group (2018)Median Hourly EarningsTypical Entry Level Education
Medical Assistants2,5551,1483.3%$13.74Postsecondary nondegree award
Receptionists and Information Clerks2,5546853.3%$10.96High school diploma or equivalent
Medical Secretaries9985221.3%$14.38High school diploma or equivalent
Nursing Assistants4,5854306.0%$10.60Postsecondary nondegree award
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses4,5812976.0%$19.42Postsecondary nondegree award
Home Health Aides1,2472831.6%$10.22High school diploma or equivalent
Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians1,4422461.9%$21.94Associate's degree
Billing and Posting Clerks6622400.9%$16.13High school diploma or equivalent
First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers1,1092261.4%$23.13High school diploma or equivalent
Pharmacy Technicians1,6012182.1%$13.93High school diploma or equivalent

Training Institutions

Home to multiple colleges and universities with strong health sciences degrees and research programs in areas such as cancer research, gene therapy, neurosciences, tropical medicine, and nursing, Greater New Orleans is a favorable research and training environment for health science professionals. Concentrations of study include non-degree credentialing opportunities, 2-year associate’s degrees, 4-year bachelor’s degrees, and specialized advanced degree programs in medicine, nursing, biomedical research, and pharmacy.

Due to the nature of the industry, many of the positions in the health sciences industry require high levels of specialized academic training that are unique to the position. Many partnerships between key assets and regional academic training institutions help to fill the need for worker demand in the industry. In fact, from 2011-2015, the completion rates at regional academic training institutions associated with the top 10 medical-specific occupations have increased by 4%. Over the next decade, the regional academic training institutions in Greater New Orleans should play a vital role in helping to meet workforce needs in the industry.

In addition to the academic training institutions in the GNO Region, health systems in the region also employ workforce development initiatives to help train the workforce. One such program is Ochsner’s partnership with the Louisiana Workforce Commission to provide free medical assistant training to eligible applicants.